Swiss Wine Regions

Aargau Wine Region

Red Wine and Grapes, Image by A. HaenniCrisscrossed by rivers, dotted with lakes, and including every type of soil a grapevine is capable of growing in, Aargau is the 4th largest German-speaking Swiss wine region.

With 393 ha., the region is sub-divided into three wine zones. The better-known wines from Klingnau, Doettingen, Tegerfelden, Wuerenlingen and Ennetbaden, are in the northeastern zone, in the Lower Aare and Limmat valleys.

The other two zones are the northwestern wine zone, between Rheinfelden and Aarau, and the Southeastern zone between the Aare and Limmat rivers.

Roughly 70% of wine production in Aargau is red wine. The main grape here is Blauburgunder (Pinot noir). Also planted are Léon Millot, Dornfelder, Regent, and Gamay x Reichensteiner (Garanoir).

The white wine is mostly from Riesling x Sylvaner, followed by Pinot gris, Räuschling, Chardonnay, Sauvignon blanc, Charmont, Gewürztraminer, and Kerner.

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The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Muscat Ottonel

Muscat Ottonel is a member of the Muscat family. Used for dry wines in Alsace and Hungary, and dessert wines in Austria and Croatia. In Switzerland it is usually used for light, dry wines. It’s parentage is believed to be the Muscat de Saumur and Chasselas.

Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains

The Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, is one of the oldest grape varieties still around. It’s linked to the Anathelicon moschaton grape used by the Ancient Greeks, and the Apiane grapevines of the Romans. A white grape, it’s a member of the Muscat family. The name comes from its small berry and tight clusters. it’s called Muscat Canelli in Valais, but also goes under lots of names: Muscat Blanc, Moscato Bianco, Muscat de Frontignan, Muscat de Lunel, Muscat d'Alsace, Muskateller, Moscatel de Grano Menudo, Moscatel Rosé and Sárgamuskotály. Theoretically a white grape, the Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains can also produce berries that are pink or reddish brown.

Johannisberg

Second in white wines of Valais (after Fendant). The name Johannisberg is only used in Valais; the rest of French-speaking Switzerland call it Gros Rhin. The grape used to make Johannisberg is the Grüner Sylvaner. The origin of the grape is not clear. On the one hand it strongly resembles the Roman Apianisien (loved by bees) grape, as described by Pliny the Elder in his “Historia naturalis”, on the other hand, its more likely birthplace is in Romanian Transylvania.

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Alcaeus

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

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