Swiss Wine Regions

Glossary of D

Decanting

The process of pouring wine from its bottle into a decanter to separate the sediment from the wine.

Dégorgement

The disgorging or removal of sediment from bottles that results from secondary fermentation.

Delicate

Describes most light to medium-bodied wines with good, clear flavors. Desirable in wines such as Riesling, Sémillon or Pinot Noir.

Demi-sec

Moderately sweet to medium sweet sparkling wine.

Denominazione di origine controllata

In Italy, Denominazione di origine controllata (“Controlled designation of origin”), of which there are three:

  • DO—Denominazione di Origine (designation of origin, seldom used)
  • DOC—Denominazione di Origine Controllata (controlled designation of origin)
  • DOCG—Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (controlled designation of origin guaranteed)
Depth

Describes a wine that shows an excellent concentration of aromas and flavors.

Dessert wine

Varies by region. In the UK, a very sweet, low alcohol wine. In the US by law, any wine containing over 15% alcohol.

Devatting

The process of separating red must from pomace, which can happen before or after fermentation.

Diurnal temperature variation

The degree of temperature variation that occurs in a wine region from daytime to night.

DOC

The abbreviation for Denominazione di Origine Controllata, or controlled place name. This is Italy’s designation for wine whose name, origin of grapes, grape varieties and other important factors are regulated by law. It is also the abbreviation for Portugal’s highest wine category, which has the same meaning in that country.

DOCG

The abbreviation for Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita, or controlled and guaranteed place name, which is the category for the highest-ranking wine in Italy.

Doux

The French word for sweet. Usually refers to the sweetest category of sparkling wines.

Downy mildew

Fungal vine disease.

Drawing off
Drip dickey

A wine accessory that slips over the neck of a wine bottle and absorbs any drips that may run down the bottle after pouring—preventing stains to table cloths, counter tops or other surfaces.

Dry

Wines with zero or very low levels of residual sugar.

Dry/Dryness

A wine that has completed fermentation and has less than 7.5 grams per litre of dissolved sugar remaining is said to have fermented to dryness. The absence of residual sugar (sweetness) in a wine leads to a dry rather than sweet finish.

Glossary by Letter

  • A (21)
  • B (36)
  • C (38)
  • D (17)
  • E (8)
  • F (24)
  • G (5)
  • H (7)
  • I (4)
  • J (2)
  • K (1)
  • L (10)
  • M (25)
  • N (5)
  • O (10)
  • P (23)
  • Q (1)
  • R (13)
  • S (31)
  • T (21)
  • U (2)
  • V (22)
  • W (11)
  • Y (2)
  • Z (1)

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Kerner

Named after local poet and physician, Justinus Kerner, the Kerner grape was hybridized in 1929 in Lauffen in the Württemberg region. A hybrid of the white Riesling and the red Trollinger (Schiava grossa), it resembles the Riesling in character. It is being vinified in limited quantities in Valais, but its future in Valais dosen’t look too bright. It continues to do well in Germany, and on a smaller basis in Austria and Italy.

Bondola

An indigenous and ancient red grape from Ticino, Bondola has slightly higher acidity and lower alcohol, and produces a good simple table wine, often called Nostrano.

Amigne

Amigne was brought to Switzerland by the Romans. This grape can also produce a Sauternes-like late harvest wine. These wines are ready to drink in two to three years, but some can be aged.

To eat, to drink and to be merry.

Ecclesiates

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes