Swiss Wine Regions

Vinea Swiss wines fair

The first weekend of September will be your chance to meet more that 150 Swiss wine producers from all over Switzerland. Better yet, you'll have the chance to taste some great wine, and ask questions of the people that produced them.

The region around Sierre is also beautiful and a good chance to combine your wine interests with hiking, photography and many of the pass times available in Switzerland.

September 2, 2011 (All day)
September 4, 2011 (All day)
Events Place: 
Sierre, Sierre
Tags:

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Sylvaner

Originally from the Danube basin, Sylvaner is widely planted in well-exposed locations in Valais where it ripens later than Chasselas, producing wines with good body, bouquet and acidity. It is also used, although rarely, for late harvest wine.

Gwäss

Gwäss is the German-ized name of Gouais Blanc.

Arvine

Another delivery from Rome, there are actually three Arvine grape varieties, only two used for wine production: Grand Arvine, with the larger berries, and Petit Arvine, with the, you guessed it, smaller berries. The unloved Arvine brune has faded from the scene. Grand Arvine gets criticized for displaying little character, whereas the Petit Arvine tends to have a fuller bouquet and lower acidity. In blind tasting, Petit Arvine generally kicks ass against its plumper brother. Arvine is also an excellent grape for late harvest wine, which can be cellared.

Cabernet will rape you and pinot noir seduces you. ... Cabernet will throw you down and rip your clothes off, and pinot noir subtly convinces you to take them off yourself.

Old French Saying

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes