Swiss Wine Regions

Züri Geschnetzeltes

(pronounciation: Zsur-ē-Gshnetz-lets)

A satisfiying speciality of Zürich , Züri Geschnetzeltes is a ragout made with veal, a white wine sauce and mushrooms. It is traditionally served with Rösti (Swiss Hash Browns). There are variations with onions, parsley, lemon zest, etc...

As to which wine, well, in that battle I claim neutrality. One side opts for one of the elegant Swiss white wines such as a Pinot grigio or Grüner Veltliner. The other side prefers the subtle Blauburgunder (Pinot noir). In either case you won't have trouble finding one made locally.

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Gewürztraminer

The name Gewürztraminer is obviously German, although the origin of the grape is the Tyrollean Alps, near the village of Termeno (Tramin) in Alto Adige, Italy. Gewürz is German for spice. The vine is evidently a pain in the ass to grow and does best in cooler climates. In Germany the wine of this grape is often made off-dry, in Alsace it’s dry and floral, and in Switzerland it produces a wide range. Gewürztraminer is one of the most pungent wine varietals and reasonably easy to identify with just your nose. It is one of the few wine that can hold its own with spicy Asian food.

Pinot Gris

Called Malvoisie in Valais, this grape has nothing to do with any of the Malvoisie varieties of the Muscat family and is another of the mutations of Pinot Noir. A vine grown in many of the Swiss areas, in Valais, Pinot Gris produces a fine sweet late harvest wine with honey overtones.

Cabernet franc

Cabernet franc, one of the Bordeaux grapes, is a bit like the little brother of the Cabernet sauvignon grape. Cabernet franc is usually used for blending.

In vino veritas.

Pliny the Elder

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes