Swiss Wine Regions

Grand Prix du Vin Suisse, 2008

No state support, no regional pre-selections, and no quotas, the Grand Prix du Vin Suisse competition is open to all Swiss wine producers, and reflects the eclectic range of Swiss wines. For the 2008 Grand Prix du Vin Suisse, 460 Swiss wine producers provided 1,860 wines for judging in 11 categories.This is a In a 20% increase over last year.

The competition, organized by Vinea and wine magazine Vinum, took place June 24-27 in Sierre, Valais. Adhering to international standards set by the Organisation Internationale de la Vigne et du Vin (OIV) and the Union Internationale des Oenologues (UIOE), the 120 judges tasted, ranked and awarded the Gold, Silver and Bronze medals as well as honorable mentions.

Winners will be announced November 7, 2008 at the Swiss Wine Night in Zurich. The Grand Prix du Vin Suisse award-winning wines will be featured in the Vinum wine magazine and be highlighted in the 2009-2010 Swiss Wine Guide, which for the first time have an English edition.

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Pinot Noir

Genetic studies have revealed that Pinot Noir is probably one of the two ancestors (the other being the humble Gouais) of some of the most important vines cultivated in Europe today. It is certainly a particularly ancient variety, and originally from Burgundy. Pinot Noir, with its associated clones, is found all over Switzerland, but it is only in the eastern region that it dominates production. It is either produced as a varietal or blended with other grapes. These blends are known as Salvagnin in Vaud and Dôle in Valais. Depending on where it is grown, it can produce a wine that is either light and fruity, or rich and full-bodied.


A new variety, developed in 1970 at Pully (Vaud), Gamaret is enjoying a growing success with producers and consumers alike. It produces a wine that is richly coloured and well-structured with sometimes-spicy notes that ages well. Gamaret is a cross between Gamay and Reichensteiner (a white grape.)


Developed in Germany by Prof. Müller (from Thurgau), this early maturing white grape variety is one of the principal white grapes cultivated in German-speaking Switzerland. Produces elegant, aromatic wines when grown in cool temperate climates. In warmer locations these qualities tend to be masked by a certain heaviness and lack of acidity.

New loves and old wine, give a man these and he never refines.

Francis Beeding

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes