Swiss Wine Regions

Michael Broger Weinbau

Michael Broger of Michael Broger Weinbau

Housed in a restored early 19th-Century farmhouse in Ottoberg, the 2.5 acres Broger Weinbau above Boltshausen is a wish realized for Michael Broger.

After an apprenticeship in wine technology and some hands-on experience with various independent wine producers in eastern Switzerland, Michael attended viniculture courses in Wädenswil as well as training in organic farming at FIBL. This was followed by a couple years working with H. U. Kesselring at Schlossgut Bachtobel, and lastly by a stint in New Zealand. Michael then turned his dream to reality and the first wines from Broger Weinbau were ready in autumn 2003

Viticulture

All work in the steep vineyards of Broger Weinbau is guided with an eye toward sustainability and protecting the land, so all the work is done by hand and no herbicides are used in the vineyard. Further, the use of fungicides has been reduced each year, and some parcels are managed following biodynamic principles. The results show that biodynamic farming is worth the effort.

Vinification

The pressing of the grapes is done on site where possible. After fermentation the young wine is moved to the house cellar without the use of pumps. Stored in wooden barrels it passes through the rhythm of the seasons, naturally developing, reducing acidity, and then resting until it’s time to bottle. The philosophy is to present the wines as naturally as possible and allow customers to truly experience vintage variations.

Schnellberg 1
Ottoberg 8561
Switzerland
Tags:
Javascript is required to view this map.

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Goron de Bovernier

Goron de Bovernier is a red grape, which according to José Vouillamoz is probably a natural hybrid of Cornalin du Valais and an unknown variety. The grape gets its name from the municipality of Bovernier, in Valais. Small quantities are still found in lower Valais.

Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains

The Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, is one of the oldest grape varieties still around. It’s linked to the Anathelicon moschaton grape used by the Ancient Greeks, and the Apiane grapevines of the Romans. A white grape, it’s a member of the Muscat family. The name comes from its small berry and tight clusters. it’s called Muscat Canelli in Valais, but also goes under lots of names: Muscat Blanc, Moscato Bianco, Muscat de Frontignan, Muscat de Lunel, Muscat d'Alsace, Muskateller, Moscatel de Grano Menudo, Moscatel Rosé and Sárgamuskotály. Theoretically a white grape, the Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains can also produce berries that are pink or reddish brown.

Merlot

Imported from the Bordeaux region, Merlot has found a second home in Ticino where it performs extremely well. Later-ripening than the other main Swiss varieties, it is hardly present in other areas. Merlot red wines are racy, tannic and richly colored. A white wine from this black grape, commercialized as Merlot Bianco, gives quite interesting results and is increasingly popular with producers and consumers alike.

He who loves not wine, women and song remains a fool his whole life long.

Martin Luther

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes