Swiss Wine Regions

Wine Appreciation

A mixture of information and philosophy

Oepfelchammer in Zürich

Oepfelchammer ZurichA hangout for artists and intelligentsia; wine, wisdom, and song has flowed in the ancient oak-paneled Oepfelchammer on the Rindermarkt in Zürich for two hundred years. Nicknamed the “Oeli”, it’s the oldest unchanged wine tavern (Weinstube) in Zürich. Read more »

Terroir, and Music on my Tongue

Grapevines on Hill near Zurich, SwitzerlandWine is like jazz, it can have finesse, variety, nuance, and surprise. terroir is one the players in the band. What is terroir , and should we care? The answer is yes, no, and it's a matter of opinion. Many opinions. Just like jazz.

First we need to agree what terroir is. I say agree - and not define, because terroir is one of those concepts that's hard to nail down because it can have an almost philosophical quality. The word terroir is French for soil. Simple enough, but the concept "terroir " in the context of wine encompasses numerous factors that influence the taste of wine. Read more »

Academie du Vin Introductory Wine Course

Swiss white wine and scenes of Switzerland

An introductory wine course is being offered by the Académie du Vin, in cooperation with COOP - the largest wine retailer in Switzerland. The Académie is an independent Swiss organization that is affiliated with the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET), and provides a series of their own courses, as well as the full WSET certification program.

Although not a requirement for starting out on the certification process, this course is a good starting off point, and equally interesting for those of us wanting to improve our wine knowledge, or for the absolute beginner to get a bit of the mystery around wine removed. At present these courses are only offered in the regional language, i.e. German in Zurich. Read more »

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Chénin blanc

The versatile “Pinot de la Loire” produces some fine wine in Valais. Like the Chasselas, it provides a neutral canvas for the winemaker’s art and terroir. Originating in the Loire valley of France, it has no relation or similarity to Pinot blanc.

Lafnetscha

Here’s an obscure language lesson. The name Lafnetscha is derived from the local dialect. Because the grape is harvested early, it makes for a acerbic wine which should not be drunk too young. In the local dialect, the verb to drink is “gelafft”, so laff-nit-scha is drink-not-already (sort of). As to the grape, it is one of the oldest in from Haut-Valais. Almost identical to the Blachier. Please see Completer for more information.

Muscat Ottonel

Muscat Ottonel is a member of the Muscat family. Used for dry wines in Alsace and Hungary, and dessert wines in Austria and Croatia. In Switzerland it is usually used for light, dry wines. It’s parentage is believed to be the Muscat de Saumur and Chasselas.

He who loves not wine, women and song remains a fool his whole life long.

Martin Luther

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes