Swiss Wine Regions

Travel and Lifestyle

Wine-related things to see and do in Switzerland, Swiss cuisine, and general information for wine lovers

Gasthaus Bad Osterfingen

The Gasthaus Bad Osterfingen is a large Inn and small wine producer in Schaffhausen (which is close to Zurich). This county restaurant has a beautiful garden, cozy “Säli”, an Art Nouveau banquet room, and two “Bauernstil”, or country style rooms : a “Stüblli”, and a tasting room.

Have a designated driver, it is not easily accessible with public transport. Read more »

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Pinot blanc

Pinot blanc is a mutation of Pinot Gris. It may have found its way up the Rhône to Valais with any number of mercenaries returning to Switzerland, and today small quantities are cultivated in many Swiss wine regions. When grown in favorable conditions it produces a fruity wine with good acidity.

Humagne Blanche

Only planted in Valais today, Humagne blanche* is another of the very old Swiss grapes, probably brought in by the Romans. Having a high iron content, and supposedly health-giving properties, this wine was decreed a “health wine” (Krankenwein) for centuries. The old written documents in which this wine is referred to as vinum hum-anum date from the 12th and 14th Centuries. It’s also called Kinderbettenwein or baby crib wine. I’ll bet those kids didn’t have much to cry about.

*no relation to the Humagne Rouge

Amigne

Amigne was brought to Switzerland by the Romans. This grape can also produce a Sauternes-like late harvest wine. These wines are ready to drink in two to three years, but some can be aged.

Nothing more excellent or valuable than wine was ever granted by the gods to man.

Plato

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes