Swiss Wine Regions

Swiss Wine

Observations about Swiss wine and grapes, and the history of wine-making in Switzerland

Winzerwy

Formed in 1969, Winzerwy is a Cooperative Association started by a group of small Swiss German wine makers to assure quality and improve marketing, The members grow, harvest, vinify and bottle on their own premisis. The Winzerwy trademark guarantees for the finest quality Swiss wines with a recognizable varietal, vintage and Terroir.

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Grapevines on a hill near Zurich, Switzerland

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Weinbaumuseum am Zürichsee (Viticulture Museum)

Viticulture Museum, Au, Lake Zurich, SwitzerlandIt's rare to describe a museum as “welcoming”, but the Viticulture Museum is welcoming. Located on the peninsula Au (near Wädenswil) on Lake Zürich, the Viticulture Museum is both a museum and a focal point for people interested in Swiss wine and wine making. It offers both a historical perspective as well as addressing changes confronting Swiss winemakers today. On the day I visited they held a demonstration of barrel making, which is an endangered craft: there are currently three barrel makers in Switzerland and only one apprentice. Read more »

Botrytis cinerea, a.k.a. Nobel Rot

Botrytis cinerea, or nobel rot. Image by Alan Haenni

Botrytis cinerea, or nobel rot, is a gray mold that infects a variety of plants, including wine grapes here in Switzerland. When it forms on grapes it's called Botrytis Bunch Rot. In contrast to its unpleasant appearance, its effect on wine grapes can be quite pleasant. In short, the Botrytis cinerea fungus pierces grape skins causing dehydration, which concentrates the sugar in the remaining juice. The resulting sweet wine can be exquisite. Read more »

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Gouais Blanc

A promiscuous grape. Not good for much, but with a long, long line of descendents, including the noble Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Possibly from Croatia, it’s called Heunisch Weiss in Central Europe.

The name Gouais is comes from ‘gou’, which is a scornful word from old French referring to its standing as the grape of the peasants. Very prevalent in the Ile-de-France and in the Champagne during the Middle Ages and perhaps brought into Valais by the descendants of the Ligurians.

Acidic and with little residual sugar, it’s primarily used to blend with low acidic wine to give it a bit of liveliness. Ampelographic studies in the old vineyards of Oberwallis have found a red Gwäss with the same characteristics as the white Gwäss. Almost abandoned, it survives in Haut-Valais hiding under the alias of Gwäss, thanks to Mr. Josef-Marie Chanton, http://www.chanton.ch/home.html

Amigne

Amigne was brought to Switzerland by the Romans. This grape can also produce a Sauternes-like late harvest wine. These wines are ready to drink in two to three years, but some can be aged.

Gamay

This is the variety that produces all the Beaujolais wines. Later-ripening than Pinot Noir, Gamay is very widespread in the western, French-speaking part of Switzerland. But it is in Geneva that it has become the dominant red variety. Produced as a varietal in Geneva or blended with Pinot Noir in Vaud (Salvagnin) and Valais (Dôle), Gamay produces lively, light wines with vivacious aromas of freshly picked red fruits. These wines are best consumed young

Wine is sunlight, held together by water!

Galileo Gallilei

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes